The Kitchen Workshop: Put ‘Em Up!

112612_SherriL-034rtOn the Kitchen Workshop, host Mary Reilly from Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks with Sherri Brooks Vinton about boiling-water canning and getting your kitchen “canning ready” so you can take advantage of the market when the mood strikes! Sherri is the author of the Put ‘Em Up series of preserving and canning cookbooks.

book_PEUcoverPutEmUpFruitPutemUpPreservingAnswer

Read on for recipes for Lemon-Ginger Marmalade and Pickled Mushrooms. Learn more about Sherri and get more recipes at www.sherribrooksvinton.com.

LEMON GINGER MARMALADE

153_cJenniferMayPhotography_LemonGingerMarmalade_PutEmUpFruitMakes 5 cups

Lemon and ginger, a classic combo of sunny and warm together in one great spread. The rind from the lemon give this marmalade some bite so it’s not all frills. This is a great topper for some hearty rustic bread that can stand up to a jam with attitude.

  • 2 pounds lemons (8–10)
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 (4-inch) knob fresh ginger, minced

Prepare

1. Using a vegetable brush, scrub the fruit with a nontoxic, odorless dish soap and hot water.

2. Cut off the tops and bottoms of the lemons deeply enough to remove the solid disks of pith and reveal the flesh of the fruit. Quarter the fruits and cut away the center rib. Flick out the seeds with the tip of your knife. Thinly slice the quartered lemons crosswise. Combine the lemon slices with the water in a large nonreactive pot and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat and set aside overnight to soften the rinds.

3. The next day, measure the volume of the lemon mixture (you should have about 4 cups). Return the lemon mixture to the pot and add an equal amount of sugar, along with the ginger. Slowly bring to a hard boil, stirring frequently to avoid burning the sugar. Continue cooking until gel stage is reached (see page 28), about 15 minutes.

4. Remove from the heat. Allow the marmalade to rest for 5 minutes, giving it an occasional gentle stir to release trapped air; it will thicken slightly. Skim off any foam.

Preserve.

Can

Use the boiling-water method as described on page 20. Ladle the marmalade into clean, hot 4-ounce or half-pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace between the top of the marmalade and the lid. Run a bubble tool along the inside of the glass to release trapped air. Wipe the rims clean; center lids on the jars and screw on jar bands until they are just fingertip-tight. Process the jars by submerging them in boiling water to cover by 2 inches for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, remove the canner lid, and let the jars rest in the water for 5 minutes. Remove the jars and set aside for 24 hours. Check the seals, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

 

PICKLED BUTTON MUSHROOMS

216_cJenniferMayPhotographyInc_PickledMushrooms_PutEmUpMakes about 2 pints

A number of cultures lay claim to mushroom pickles: Italy, Germany, and Poland all have their style with these tasty bites. I’ve taken the United Nations’ approach — this is a mash-up recipe that takes a little bit from each tradition.

  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed
  • 1 pound white button mushrooms, stemmed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, seeded and chopped

PREPARE

Combine the vinegar, brown sugar, bay leaves, salt, peppercorns, and fennel seed in a large nonreactive saucepan, and bring to a boil. Add the mushrooms, onion, and bell pepper and return to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

PRESERVE

Refrigerate: Transfer to bowls or jars. Cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to 3 weeks.

Can: Use the boiling-water method. Ladle into clean, hot pint canning jars, covering the solids by 1/4 inch with liquid. Leave 1/4 inch of headspace between the top of the liquid and the lid. Release trapped air. Wipe the rims clean; center lids on the jars and screw on jar bands. Process for 20 minutes. Turn off heat, remove canner lid, and let jars rest in the water for 5 minutes. Remove jars and set aside for 24 hours. Check seals, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.… Read More

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The Kitchen Workshop: Modern Juicing With Mimi Kirk

Ultimate Book of Modern JuicingOur Kitchen Workshop host, Mary Reilly of Edible Pioneer Valley, talks with Mimi Kirk, the author of The Ultimate Book of Modern Juicing. In this fast-paced discussion they discuss making nut milks at home (you don’t need anything more than a good blender), and ways to create juices on the fly––no recipes needed!

Read on for Mimi’s recipes for Almond Milk and A Cold Killer juice, guaranteed to quash any spring sniffles.

 

32945576Almond Milk

Only 60 calories for an 8-ounce glass, and there’s no cholesterol or saturated fat so it’s heart healthy.

  • 1 cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • 3½ cups filtered water (more if you prefer a thinner milk)
  • 2 Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Strain soaked almonds and rinse well. Soaking releases the enzyme inhibitors and makes for easier digestion. Place nuts in high-speed blender and add water, dates, and vanilla, and process until smooth. Place a nut milk filter bag or paint strainer bag over a bowl, and then pour the almond milk into the bag. With one hand hold the top of the bag, and with the other hand proceed to squeeze all the milk from the bag into the bowl. If you don’t have a bag, a wire strainer or cheesecloth will work, but a bag makes the job easier. (A nut milk filter bag can be purchased online and paint strainer bags can be found at your local hardware store.)

Once all the liquid is squeezed into the bowl, pour it into a large glass container with a screw-top lid, such as a Mason jar, and store in the refrigerator. Milk will last about 3 to 4 days.

 

Chocolate Almond Milk

Cacao powder and cacao nibs are a great source of magnesium, which plays a role in muscle function, circulation, and bone strength.

  • 1½ cups almond milk
  • 3–4 tablespoons cacao powder (more if you like it richer)
  • 2–3 tablespoons maple syrup or 4–5 dates

Blend all ingredients adding maple syrup or dates to taste. Refrigerate to chill.

 

mimi-kirkA Cold Killer

  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 2 small garlic cloves
  • ½ beet
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 oranges, juiced
  • 1-inch piece of ginger
  • Liquid of choice as needed

Blend all ingredients, adding liquid as necessary.… Read More

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The Kitchen Workshop: Tomatomania! with Scott Daigre

TomatomaniaKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Scott Daigre about his book Tomatomania. Written with Jenn Garbee, Tomatomania tell us all we need to know about selecting, planting and growing gorgeous juicy tomatoes!

We talked about planting the perfect tomato plot and his favorite tomato recipe. Learn more about becoming a tomatomaniac at www.tomatomania.com.

Favorite Tomato recipeMy Favorite Tomato Recipe

Rigorously tested countless times. Foolproof. Pick a ripe, beautifully colored, and slightly soft tomato off the vine. The only thing better than trying this with one perfectly ripe, juicy tomato? Trying it with ten perfectly ripe tomatoes of different colors and types. You’re welcome!

WASH IT. (Or not.)

CUT IT. (Or not.)

SALT IT. (Or not.)

EAT IT. (Best done outdoors.)

Sure, many of you will eliminate the salt-it step and that’s fine with me. You’ve worked really hard to get to this step and final product. Don’t miss the opportunity to savor the basic essence of this crop you’ve grown in your own backyard. Dive right in!

Pineapple (Tomato) Upside-Down Cake

Makes 1 cake; 8 to 10 servings

image001Super sweet and citrusy tomatoes alike are pretty near perfect in this rustic cornmeal cake. Use bicolor yellow varieties splashed with streaks of red, such as sweet Pineapple tomatoes (you bet there is a Pineapple variety!) if you have them. Citrusy green tomatoes mellow a bit color-wise when baked, but are also fantastic.

1 pound (1 very large or two medium) very ripe, sweet tomatoes

8 tablespoons (1 stick) plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature, divided, plus more to butter the cake pan

½ cup dark brown sugar, packed

2 teaspoons orange zest, packed (about 1 medium orange), fruit reserved for juicing

1 teaspoon lemon zest, packed (about 1 medium lemon)

½ cup honey

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

½ cup sour cream

¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice

¾ cup all-purpose flour

1 cup cornmeal

1½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Crème fraîche and honey, to serve (optional)

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly butter a 9-inch round cake pan, line the bottom with parchment paper, and butter the paper. Slice the tomatoes 1⁄3 inch thick and spread them out on paper towels to drain.
  1. Melt 3 tablespoons butter over medium-high heat in a small saucepan. Add the brown sugar and cook just until the sugar is melted, about 1 minute. Pour the brown sugar paste into the prepared cake pan and immediately spread it out as evenly as possible using a heat-proof spatula. Combine the orange and lemon zests and sprinkle 1 teaspoon over the top of the brown sugar.
  1. Combine the remaining 8 tablespoons butter, honey, eggs, sour cream, orange juice, and remaining 2 teaspoons of orange-lemon zest in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix well. (Alternatively, use a hand mixer.) In a small bowl, whisk the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, add the butter mixture, and mix until just combined.
  1. Blot any moisture off the tomatoes and arrange them decoratively in the bottom of the pan. (I like to leave a little space between the slices to see the patterns in each). Pour the batter over the tomatoes. Bake until the cake is lightly brown, starts to pull away from the sides, and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Allow the cake to cool in the pan on a wire rack for 20 minutes. Run a knife around the edges of the pan, place a serving plate on top, and (wearing oven mitts!), flip the cake onto the plate. Allow the cake to cool completely. To gild the lily, serve the cake with a dollop of creme fraiche and a drizzle of honey.

Prime picks: Sweet bicolors like Pineapple, Gold Medal, or Grandma Viney’s Yellow Pink, or citrusy green varieties such as Ananas Noire (Black Pineapple) or Aunt Ruby’s German Green.… Read More

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Underground Airwaves – Brewing Stories w/ Brian Yaeger

Oregon beer aficionado & author Brian Yaeger

If there is one thing that is held sacred in Oregon it is beer. Rarely do you see breweries go out of business, and when they do it is almost never because they were having trouble selling beer. When Brian Yaeger, who wrote “Red, White, and Brew” set out to write his latest book, “Oregon Breweries“, it was an incredibly daunting task; ultimately he would have to visit 192 breweries all over this sprawling state.

We talk with Brian on this episode of the podcast about his journey while writing the book. He talks about a few of the gems he found along the way and why Oregon is such a fertile place for good beer. He also talks about how a donut maker taught him to appreciate the stories of the people behind the food. The story and interview were recorded at KBOO Community Radio in Portland, OR.

Read more from Brian on his website: BrianYaeger.com

Oregon beer aficionado & author Brian Yaeger

Buy Yaeger’s latest book from your favorite, local, independent bookseller


…And don’t forget his previous book as well!

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Underground Airwaves – City Pigs with Catherine McNeur

When cities formed, they were essentially just groups of people coming together in one place. What we imagine as a city now is a far cry from what they were originally.

Catherine McNeur, a historian and professor at Portland State University, takes a look at New York City during it’s infancy in her book Taming Manhattan: Environmental Battles in the Antebellum City.  The book covers a period of time when a politician’s view on the issue of urban pigs could make or break them.  On this episode of the podcast, Catherine talks about the book, including the early pig riots, how the city interacted with the nearby farms, and the push away from local foods. She also tells a story about her move to Portland and how she kept running into urban livestock while finishing the book.

The story and interview were recorded at KBOO Community Radio in Portland, OR. Find more information about Taming Manhattan at CatherineMcNeur.com.

 
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The Blue Plate Special: Defending Beef with Nicolette Hahn Niman

Rancher and environmentalist Nicolette Hahn Niman

Join rancher and environmental activist Nicolette Hahn Niman to discuss her new book, Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production.  Ms. Niman discusses the impact of beef on our health and out earth, the reasons our grasslands need ruminants, and how it is that a long-time vegetarian could become a cattle rancher.

Chef Kurt Michael Friese, publisher of Edible Iowa and owner of Devotay Restaurant & Bar, co-hosts with his sister Christine.

See a review of the book in Edible Iowa here.

See James Beard Award winner (and friend of the show) Barry Estabrook’s review of it here.

Get your copy from your favorite local, independent bookseller

 

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The Blue Plate Special: Patrick Martins and the Carnivore’s Manifesto

Patrick MartinsEdible Iowa publisher Kurt Friese and his co-host/sister Christine Friese speak with Patrick Martins, author of The Carnivore’s Manifesto: Eating Well, Eating Responsibly, and Eating Meat.  Martins is also the founder of Heritage Foods USA, Heritage Radio, and was the founding director of Slow Food USA, which is how he and Kurt first met.

Martins shares why you should not be a “Hipster Hater,” the meaning of the word “Têtoirs,” and why it’s sometimes good and sometimes not so good to be a vegetarian.

Afterwards Kurt and Christine discuss how there’s much more to sprouts than alfalfa. Edibleseacoast.com gets a shoutout in this episode.

And as mentioned, if you would like to start your own Edible, click here.

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The Kitchen Workshop with Mark Bittman

headshot phot credit Fred Conrad_NY TimesKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley  speaks with Mark Bittman. Mark is probably most famous for his cookbooks How to Cook Everything, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, and Vegan Before 6. He is now an opinion columnist for the New York Times and many other publications, focused on policy, agriculture, health, the environment as well as cooking and eating. He’s an outspoken advocate of the idea that we all just need to cook more. His new book How To Cook Everything Fast is in bookstores now.

Mary and Mark discuss the simple changes we can all make to improve our diets. Mark also outlines the many ways we can take action outside our own kitchens.

You can find links to Mark’s books, videos and columns at MarkBittman.com.

Watch Mark’s keynote address at the 2014 Edible Institute.

Get the new book from your favorite local, independent bookstore

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The Kitchen Workshop: Glorious Kale with Catherine Walthers

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley is joined by Catherine Walthers. Cathy is a personal chef and food writer. She is the author of four cookbooks, the latest of which is Kale, Glorious Kale.

Join us in the Workshop as Mary and Cathy discuss varieties of kale, the perfect kale chip and kale cocktails! Cathy also shares her secret for making the perfect kale salad (hint: it involves massage therapy!).


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Recipes below the fold for Kale Granola and the Emerald Gimlet Cocktail… Read More

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Kitchen Workshop: Twelve Recipes with Chef Cal Peternell of Chez Panisse

Cal Peternell_credit Ed Anderson

Chef Cal Peternell. Photo by Ed Anderson

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Cal Peternell about his book Twelve Recipes. Cal been a part of the team at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California for nearly twenty years and is currently the chef of the downstairs restaurant.

His book embraces the idea that we should know how to cook a few things well. Then we can use those recipes as springboard for more creative thought. Twelve Recipes is written from a professional chef’s perspective, so experienced cooks will feel as if they have found a peer in its pages. But, it’s written from a father’s point of view as well; so a less-experienced cook will also find a comforting voice. Learn more about Cal Peternell at CalPeternell.com, and pick up a copy of Twelve Recipes at your favorite local bookseller!

Shop Indie Bookstores Recipes for Pesto and Leblebi  below the fold … Read More

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