Kitchen Workshop: Cream Puffs and More with Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan - Photo by  Alan Richardson

Dorie Greenspan – Photo by Alan Richardson

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Dorie Greenspan about her latest book Baking Chez Moi, Recipes from my Paris Home to your Home Anywhere. Listen and learn about falling in love (with pastry), the intricacies of working with French butter in American kitchens and the secret of “The French Bake”.

Learn more about Dorie Greenspan

Order the book from a local, independent bookseller:


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We discussed success with cream puffs on the show. Here is Dorie’s recipe for Chocolate Cream Puffs with Mascarpone Filling

Chocolate Cream Puffs with Mascarpone Filling
Makes 15 puffs

For about twenty-four hours, I thought I had invented chocolate pâte à choux, and those hours were pretty sweet. I’d never tasted chocolate cream puffs, I’d never seen them and I was so tickled that I’d made them. And then chocolate cream puffs seemed to pop up in books and magazines, pâtisseries and restaurants everywhere. Had I just never noticed?

While everything made with pâte à choux is dramatic, these are both dramatic and sexy. It’s the magic of that vixen, cocoa. There’s not much of it in the dough, but it’s enough to transform the traditional cream puff, to turn it dark, dark brown and to give it a true chocolate flavor.

The puffs make wonderful Profiteroles and they’re fun with a crackle top, but I like them most filled with something velvety, like chocolate mousse or a mix of mascarpone and whipped cream, as in this recipe. Consider going totally romantic and adding a little rose extract (available online) to the mascarpone filling, maybe even tinting it pink, and then surprising your Valentine with a platter piled high with puffs.

For the cream puffs

½ cup (68 grams) all-purpose flour
1½ tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/3 cup (80 ml) water
¼ cup (60 ml) whole milk
½ stick (4 tablespoons;
2 ounces; 57 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
2 large eggs, at room temperature
For the filling
½ cup (113 grams) mascarpone, chilled
½ cup (120 ml) very cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract or ½ teaspoon pure rose extract, preferably Star Kay
White, or rose water to taste
Red food coloring (optional)
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting To make the puffs:

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.

Sift the flour and cocoa together into a small bowl.

Put the water, milk, butter, sugar and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the flour and cocoa all at once, lower the heat to medium-low and, using a wooden spoon or sturdy heatproof spatula, stir like mad. The mixture will come together in a ball and there will be a film on the bottom of the pan, but don’t stop stirring—give it another minute of energetic beating. Transfer the hot dough to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or a large bowl in which you can use a hand mixer, and let it rest for 2 minutes.

Beat the dough for 1 minute, then add the eggs one by one, beating very well after each egg goes in. You’ll have a smooth, shiny dough.

Place mounds of dough on the baking sheets using a small cookie scoop (one with a 2-teaspoon capacity, my tool of choice) or dropping the dough by small spoonfuls; leave about 2 inches between them.

Slide the baking sheet into the oven, then immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees F. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, rotating the sheet at the midway point, or until the puffs feel hollow and lift off the paper or mat easily. Cool to room temperature on a cooling rack before filling.

To make the filling:

Put the mascarpone in a medium bowl and, using a flexible spatula, stir it gently to loosen it. Beating makes mascarpone grainy, so go easy.

Whip the heavy cream in a small bowl just until it starts to thicken. Beat in the sugar and vanilla or rose extract and continue to whip until the cream holds medium peaks. If you’re using red food coloring, add a drop and mix it in, then add more coloring, if needed. Continue to mix until the cream holds firm peaks. Stir a spoonful of the cream into the mascarpone to lighten it, then gently fold in the remainder.

(The cream can be made a few hours ahead and refrigerated.)

To fill the puffs: Just before serving, cut or carefully pull the cream puffs apart at their middles. If you’d like, you can hollow out the base of the puffs by removing the custardy interior. (I like the creamy center and always leave it.) Spoon or pipe some filling (using a pastry bag with a plain tip or a zipper-lock plastic bag from which you’ve snipped off a corner) into the base of each puff; replace the tops. If you’d like, the puffs can be chilled for about 30 minutes.

Dust the puffs with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

Serving:

The puffs should be served at room temperature or slightly chilled. If you want to go deliciously overboard, you could pass some chocolate sauce at the table. Storing: The cream puffs can be scooped and frozen for up to 2 months before baking—bake them from the freezer, no defrosting necessary. And the cream filling can be made a few hours ahead and kept refrigerated. However, it’s best to fill the puffs just before serving.… Read More

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Underground Airwaves – Chewing the Fat with Render Magazine

cover_webThere is a new quarterly magazine in Portland and it will likely interest readers of Edible Publications.  Render and the focus of the magazine is on food and feminism.  After a successful Kickstarter campaign this past summer, they have started printing the magazine.  The first issue of the magazine takes a look at flesh; from women in the field of butchering to food and issues with weight.

On this episode of the podcast we talk with Gabi de Leon, founder and creative director, and Danielle Knott, executive director, about the origin story of the magazine as well as what they want to accomplish five years down the road. Gabi starts off the podcast with a story about how a butchering class with the Portland Meat Collective enabled her to be more in touch with her own flesh. The story and interview were recorded at KBOO Community Radio.

You can subscribe to Render Magazine at RenderFoodMag.com

 

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Underground Airwaves – Baking Baguettes with Sam Fromartz

Sam-FromartzIf you are interested in reading a new food book, look no further than In Search of the Perfect Loaf: A Home Baker’s Odyssey by Sam Fromartz.

In the book, Sam takes us on a journey around the world where he works with some of the best bakers.  He also talks about some of his accomplishments as an amateur baker, including baking for a dinner hosted by local food maven Alice Waters.

Along with the many stories, Sam includes several recipes with detailed instructions that highlight the breads contained in that chapter.  It is a captivating and inspiring read. Sam was in Portland to give a reading at Powell’s Books when I got the chance to talk with him.  On the podcast, he tells a story about a trip to France, talks about the book, and explains some of what it takes to make good bread.  The story and interview were recorded at KBOO Community Radio.

Find more information about Sam Fromartz and his book, In Search of the Perfect Loaf: A Home Baker’s Odyssey at chewswise.com

 

 

 

 

Buy In Search of the Perfect Loaf from a local, independent bookseller near you.

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The Kitchen Workshop: Michael Dietsch’s Shrubs – An Old-Fashioned Drink for Modern Times

DSC_0836Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Michael Dietsch about his book Shrubs, An Old Fashioned Drink for Modern Times.

Basically, shrubs are an acidulated fruit syrup. Originally enjoyed as a thirst-quenching non-alcoholic drink, they are now enjoyed in cocktails as well. Michael fills us in on the history of shrubs, from antiquity to today, and shares ideas for several ways to prepare your own versions.

Here’s a recipe for an Apple-Cinnamon Shrub to enjoy this fall. Pick up a copy of Shrubs for more inspiration.

Cinnamon-Apple Shrub

  • 3 medium apples, quartered (no need to core or seed them)
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup turbinado sugar
  • 2 cinnamon sticks

Using a box grater or a food processor, shred apples. Add shredded apples, cider vinegar, sugar and cinnamon to a nonreactive container. Cover and leave in a cool place on the countertop for up to 2 days. After 2 days, place a fine-mesh strainer over a bowl. Strain apple mixture. Squeeze or press apple mixture to remove any remaining liquid. Pour liquid into clean mason jar or glass bottle. Add lid or cap and then shake well to combine. Place in refrigerator. Discard solids. Shrub will keep for up to 1 year.

Shrubsi1.cvr.DesComp

Buy “Shrubs” from a local, independent bookseller near you

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Underground Airwaves – Loving Dutch Ovens with Ian Harris

IMG_1907This is actually take two for this episode of the podcast. Ian Harris and Underground Airwaves host Chris Seigel originally took a canoe trip out on Smith and Bybee Lakes, where they recorded the story and interview. Unfortunately, the audio was poor and they had to invoke the “redo,” re-recording the episode at KBOO.

Ian Harris, who recently wrote an article for Edible Portland, flips the script on the podcast by sharing a recipe from his ever-evolving “The Dutch Lovin’ Cookbook” instead of a story. We talk about dutch oven cooking for a while and scheme up a new Portland food hot spot. Before you get too upset, in the interview he does tell a great story about a time he did not heed the advice of poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Enjoy the episode!

Read Ian’s story, Gifts of the Desert, at edibleportland.com

Read about some of Ian’s trips on his tumblr, Après Ski Instructor

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The Kitchen Workshop: More from Saveur’s India Issue with Kellie Evans

saveur__aambaIn this episode we continue our conversation on Saveur’s India issue, with Kellie Evans, an Associate Editor at Saveur. As the hunter, gatherer and writer of recipes for Saveur she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how recipes are produced for each issue.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:

Aamba Khatta (Sweet and Sour Mango Pickle)
Aloo Masala (South Indian Masala Potatoes)
Caramel Lassi
Ghanta Tarkari (Mixed Vegetable Coconut Curry)
Dosas
Palakoora Vepadu (Andhra-Style Sautéed Spinach)

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The Kitchen Workshop: Indian Wedding Food with Saveur’s Betsy Andrews

saveur__maacherWe spoke with Betsy Andrews, Acting Editor in Chief of Saveur Magazine, about Saveur’s India Issue. Join us on this podcast for a discussion of the culinary traditions of different regions of India. Betsy was a visitor at a wedding in Kashmir and tells us about the traditional wedding caterer (waza) and the 36-dish feast (wazwaan) he prepares. Enjoy the flavors of a Kashmiri wedding with Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce).

She also takes us to the Kashmiri city of Srinagar and together we visit its marvelous floating gardens and boat markets.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:
Maacher Johl (Bengali-Style Fish Stew)
Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce)
Sevaya Kheer (Vermicelli Milk Pudding)
Shahi Tukra (Royal Toast)
Smita Chandra’s Rasam (Spicy Tamarind Soup)

On this episode, Betsy Andrews of Saveur Magazine describes her visit to the Kashmir region of India. As we recorded, in early September 2014, news reports describing the worst monsoon flooding and landslides in 100 years started to come out of the region. As of September 17, the current death toll from the floods in Indian Kashmir is estimated at over 200, and tens of thousands of residents are homeless. Our thoughts go out to the victims of the disaster.

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Underground Airwaves – The Apple Tree and Misery with Brian Rohr

IBrianRohrApplen this episode, we’re replacing a personal food story with a food fable from France. Professional storyteller Brian Rohr, who specializes in unearthing and bringing life to ancient tales and myths, joins Underground Airwaves to tell the story of an ancient apple tree and the woman who owned it. It is a bit longer than the stories we regularly showcase, but we guarantee that when you get to the end you will want it to continue. Listen in, enjoy, and learn more about Brian Rohr’s live story telling performances at the link below.

Find more information about Brian Rohr and his Sacred Storytelling Series at brianrohr.com

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Underground Airwaves – Surreptitious Foraging with Stacey Givens

TOC-2_winner-restaurant-stacey-givens

Illustration by Cassandra Swan

Urban farming is on the upward trend but it takes a lot of hard work and perseverance to make a living at it. Stacey Givens, owner and creator of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen, is putting in that hard work running a diversified operation. A recent recipient of a Local Hero Award, Stacey talks about the process of starting The Side Yard and its evolution over the years.

Find out more about Stacey and The Side Yard at TheSideYardPDX.com

 

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Underground Airwaves – Food Stories from Cherry Sprout

photo 2 photo 1Back in April, Underground Airwaves host Chris Siegel set up a story recording booth at Cherry Sprout Produce for their Earth Day celebration. There was live music, a knife sharpener, a small child struggling to push a reel mower - it was a beautiful setting for a day where folks were gathered to celebrate the earth. A variety of stories were told and a few of those are featured in this episode. The stories range from deeply personal to comedic, and there are moments when the event invades the story booth. Our guest storytellers on this episode are Luis Sandoval, Emily Ball-Lumbard, Larry Yes, and a special surprise guest.

Learn more about Cherry Sprout Produce at CherrySprout.com

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