Archive | Podcasts

Foodology with Gregory Gould

GouldOur guest is Gregory Gould, Albuquerque based foodologist, food scholar and activist.

Foodology is the interdisciplinary study of food from the perspectives of economics, sociology, anthropology, history, agriculture, medicine, nutrition, biology, religion and politics.

Gregory Gould presents lectures and workshops on food history to provide better information on issues related to Diabetes prevention and obesity.

See our previous feature about the work Gregory Gould is doing here:

http://ediblesantafe.com/read/peasant-picnic-lunch-with-greg-gould/

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Lavender from Los Poblanos with Aimee Conlee

Bees_lavender-fields_7-2014_Web1-940x563Recently, I returned to the well-know Los Poblanos property in Albuquerque’s North Valley, just east of the Rio Grande.

On my last visit, I spoke at length with Executive Chef, Jonathan Perno about his creative process and vision their restaurant and wholesale operation.

This, time I set out to learn more about the wholesale side of Los Poblanos.  So I for the interview, I found myself sitting inside a cozy little packing and storage building building on the north end of the property, talking  about the unique and varied Los Poblanos Lavender Products with Project Manager, Aimee Conlee.

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Farmer Ric Murphy & Sol Harvest Farm


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Farmer Ric Murphy and his wife, Aimee Conlee are the founders of Sol Harvest Farms a small urban, organic farm in Albuquerque, NM offering local, seasonal, year-round fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers! 

Built from a foundation of their locally grown  “leafy greens” products, their fast-growing business exemplifies an ideal, efficient, community focused farm-to-table operation. Sol Harvest grows seasonal fruits, aimee1vegetables, herbs and flowers all year-round.Sol Harvest serves local restaurants, independent grocers and sells what it grows at the Downtown Growers Market near downtown Albuquerque.

Today, they are growing “organically” through their heartfelt connection to community, keeping a pulse with the local demand.

Recently, I spoke with Farmer Ric Murphy about their story, their challenges, their success and their vision for Sol Harvest. The story starts with a powerful team with complimentary skill sets, and an eye for opportunity on a local level.

http://solharvestfarm.com

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Special Edition: Eating Words – The Edible Institute Food Writing Conference in the City of Literature

Edible Words Logo FinalLater this year, some of the best writers in food are gathering at Eating Words in Iowa City. Eating Words is Edible Institute’s first conference devoted exclusively to the art of food writing and journalism. Over three days in October, you’ll learn about memoir writing, food journalism, and perfecting the perfect pitch.
Host Mary Reilly, publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley and host of the Kitchen Workshop chatted about what to expect with Tracey Ryder, Edible Communities‘ founder; Kurt Friese, Publisher of Edible Iowa (and host of The Blue Plate Special right here on Edible Radio), and Barry Estabrook, author of Pig Tales and Tomatoland. , who blogs at PoliticsOfThePlate.com.
There’s plenty more information about Eating Words here: agenda, speakers, and contemporaneous events like a Brewfest and the Iowa City Book Festival!
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The Blue Plate Special: Celebrating Paula Wolfert with Emily Kaiser Thelin

Writer Emily Kaiser Thelin. Photo by Quentin Bacon

Emily Kaiser Thelin is a writer and editor based in Berkeley with a focus on food, drink, travel and design. A two-time finalist for James Beard awards, from 2006 to 2010 she was a food editor at Food & Wine. In 2007 she co-authored The Harney and Sons Guide to Teawith Michael Harney, published by Penguin Press. Her work has also appeared in the Best Food WritingseriesOprah, Dwell, Gourmet, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Timesand The Washington Post.

Now she is hard at work with her friend and mentor Paula Wolfert on their new Kickstarter-funded project: UNFORGETTABLE: Bold Flavors from a Renegade Life, a retrospective on Wolfert’s life and career in light of the onset of Alzheimers.

In this episode of The Blue Plate Special, hosts Kurt and Christine Friese talk to Thelin about Wolfert’s remarkable career and how the new project is coming together.

Click here to contribute the campaign, see their video and the recipes discussed in this episode.

Edible Words Logo Final

Get you tickets now for Eating Words: The Edible Institute Food Writing Conference in the City of Literatur

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Cuisine Ka-Ching: Tastee with the Apple at the Core

Greg Hackenbracht of Tastee AppleGreg Hackenbracht Grows a Tastee Apple…

Family-owned and operated since 1974 in the historic Village of Newcomerstown, Ohio, Tastee Apple, Inc. has sold over 250,000,000 apples with candy, chocolate, caramel, and other toppings.  Entrepreneur, Greg Hackenbracht joins us on this segment of Cuisine KaChing. Greg started the Company along with his father, John, when he was only 19 years old.

For 40 years, Greg, along with his management team has been guiding the enterprise with his focus on quality, innovation, culture, process and profit with a passion for constant improvement. And, they’ve frown the Company organically by simply listening to their customers.

The only U.S.A.-based company in the industry certified by the Safe Quality Food Institute, all of the apples go through a unique, seven-step rating process to guarantee the quality and freshness of the fruit. They work with several select apple growers from Missouri, Washington and other locations, favoring the northern-most suppliers because they tend to produce a firmer, longer lasting apple, one that is most optimal for their particular process. Only fresh packers are used

Perfectly-ripe apples are “dipped” in made-from-scratch, small-batch, kettle-cooked caramel or a candy coating. After the apples cool, they are rolled in gooey toppings like milk, dark or white chocolate and then rolled in fresh peanuts, pecans, cookies, or pretzels. The candy and caramel apples are then carefully packaged, stored and shipped to stores throughout the country to enjoy with family and friends.

The company has achieved a fascinating balance of “home-made-from-scratch quality along with process-manufacturing and massive scale.

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Cuisine KaChing: Executive Chef, Jonathan Perno at Los Poblanos Farm

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I recently visited with Executive Chef, Jonathan Perno at Los Poblanos Farm. A native New Mexican, Jonathan trained at the California Culinary Academy and spent time at Postrio under Wolfgang Puck, Splendido and Alain Rondelli in San Francisco, Sweet Basil in Vail, Colorado, Splendido at The Château in Beaver Creek, Colorado, and Metropolitan in Salt Lake City, Utah. His résumé also includes the requisite European culinary tour, a return visit to work at La Tante Claire in London.

In addition, he spent a year in Berkley, California at an organic farm learning raised bed farming.

Jonathan is the perfect fit for Los Poblanos. His first few months here found him doing everything from harvesting honey from our bees for his homemade chocolates to preparing a 6-course chef’s meal for an anniversary dinner for 75. He is a strong advocate of the Farm to Table philosophy and the Slow Food Movement. While he’s absolutely content to let the fresh ingredients take all the credit, Jonathan has already impressed the most critical of foodies with his own unique perspective on food.

The Los Poblanos land was originally inhabited by the Anasazi (ancient pueblo Indians) in the 14th century. Many of the original settlers in this area were thought to have come from Puebla, Mexico, a citizen of which is called a “Poblano.” The land became part of the Elena Gallegos land grant around 1716. The original ranch land was owned by Ambrosio and Juan Cristobal Armijo through the 19th century but was reassembled by Albert and Ruth Simms in the 1930s. Los Poblanos today encompasses the original headquarters of the 800-acre ranch owned by the Congressman, Albert Simms, and his wife, Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms that extended to the crest of the Sandia Mountains. Our historic inn was their private residence and the center of operations of their dairy, farming, nursery, art businesses, and dynamic cultural and educational endeavors. In 1932, Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms commissioned architect John Gaw Meem and numerous WPA artists and craftsmen to renovate the ranch house and create the Cultural Center for political and community events and recreation with gardens designed by Rose Greeley.

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The Kitchen Workshop: Cookie Love with Mindy Segal

Sega_Cookie LoveKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks with Mindy Segal about her book Cookie Love, treating a cookie like a meal and building  your cookie making pantry. Mindy is the author of Cookie Love and the proprietor and pastry creator of Hot Chocolate Restaurant and Dessert Bar in Chicago. She has graciously shared her recipe for Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah.

FLEUR DE SEL SHORTBREAD WITH VANILLA HALVAH

Segal_Mindy

 

I AM ALWAYS ON a quest to find more ways to use halvah in desserts. Coffee, chocolate, and cocoa nibs are my usual pairings with the Middle Eastern sesame confection, but one day I shifted gears in favor of vanilla and fleur de sel. It worked—halvah anchored the vanilla-flecked frosting, for a sweet, salty, nutty result. To finish the cookies, I dip them partially in dark milk chocolate and then place a shaving of halvah on top. The frosting is seasoned well to balance its sweetness, but because the cookies themselves carry a noticeable salt level, you may prefer to add less. If using a sea salt that is not as light and flaky as Murray River (see page 267 for a description of the salt), reduce the salt by 1 tablespoon.

To cut out the cookies, you will need a rectangular cutter approximately 13⁄4 by 21⁄2 inches. To pipe the frosting, you will need the Ateco tip #32.

Makes approximately 28 sandwich cookies.

SHORTBREAD

11⁄2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (13 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

11⁄4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

2 extra-large egg yolks, at room temperature

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons sea salt flakes

FROSTING

8 ounces plain or vanilla halvah, cubed

2 ounces white chocolate, melted

11⁄4 cups (10 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted

1⁄2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt

1⁄2 teaspoon sea salt flakes, or to taste

TO FINISH

Piece of plain or vanilla halvah, for garnish

8 ounces milk chocolate, melted

Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah CookieStep #1: Make the Shortbread

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and mix on low speed to incorporate. Increase the speed to medium and cream the butter mixture until it is aerated and looks like frosting, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together.

Put the yolks in a small cup or bowl and add the vanilla.

In a bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.

On medium speed, add the yolks, one at a time, and mix until the batter resembles cottage cheese, approximately 5 seconds for each yolk. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together. Mix on medium speed for 20 to 30 seconds to make nearly homogeneous.

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on low speed until the dough just comes together but still looks shaggy, approxi- mately 30 seconds. Do not overmix. Remove the bowl from the stand mixer. With a plastic bench scraper, bring the dough completely together by hand.

Stretch two sheets of plastic wrap on a work surface. Divide the dough in half and place each half on a piece of the plastic wrap. Pat each half into a rectangle, wrap tightly, and refrigerate until chilled throughout, at least 2 hours or preferably overnight.

Let the dough halves sit at room tempera- ture until the dough has warmed up some but is still cool to the touch, 15 to 20 minutes.

Put a sheet of parchment paper the same dimensions as a half sheet (13 by 18-inch) pan on the work surface and dust lightly with flour. Put one dough half on top.

Using a rolling pin, roll the dough half into a rectangle approximately 11 by 13 inches and 1⁄4 inch thick or slightly under. If the edges become uneven, push a bench scraper against the dough to straighten out the sides. To keep the dough from sticking to the parchment paper, dust the top with flour, cover with another piece of parchment paper, and, sandwiching the dough between both sheets of parch- ment paper, flip the dough and paper over. Peel off the top layer of parchment paper and continue to roll. Any time the dough starts to stick, repeat the sand- wiching and flipping step with the parchment paper.

Ease the dough and parchment paper onto a half sheet pan. Repeat with the remaining dough half and stack it on top. Cover with a piece of parchment paper and refrigerate the layers until firm, at least 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350°F. Line a couple of half sheet pans with parchment paper.

Let the dough sit at room temperature for up to 10 minutes. Invert the dough onto a work surface and peel off the top sheet of parchment paper. Roll a dough docker over the dough or pierce it numerous times with a fork. Using a 1 3⁄4 by 2 1⁄2-inch rectangular cutter, punch out the cookies. Reroll the dough trimmings, chill, and cut out more cookies.

Put the shortbread on the prepared sheet pans, evenly spacing up to 16 cookies per pan.

Bake one pan at a time for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan and bake until the cookies feel firm and hold their shape when touched, 3 to 5 minutes more. Let the cookies cool completely on the sheet pans. Repeat with the remaining pan.

Step #2: Frost the Cookies

Blend the halvah in a food processor until fairly smooth. Drizzle in the white chocolate and blend until incorporated. The halvah will turn into a thick paste.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter briefly on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and beat until the butter mixture is aerated and pale in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the frosting together. Briefly mix in the vanilla and salts until incorporated, approximately 1 minute. Add the halvah paste and mix until smooth, with a little texture left from the halvah.

Fit a pastry bag with the Ateco tip #32 and fill with the frosting.

Make pairs of similar-size cookies. Turn half of the cookies over. Leaving an 1⁄8-inch border, pipe rows of dots onto the cookies. The frosting should be approximately as thick as the cookie. Top each frosted cookie with a second cookie and press lightly to adhere.

Step #3: Finish the Cookies

Freeze the piece of halvah until chilled, 30 minutes.

Line two half sheet pans with parchment paper. Dip a quarter of the long side
of each sandwich cookie into the milk chocolate, shake off the excess, and place on the prepared pans. Using a vegetable peeler, shave a piece or two of halvah and place onto the chocolate- dipped part of each cookie. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firm, approximately 1 hour.

The cookies can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week.Read More

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The Kitchen Workshop with Mark Bittman

headshot phot credit Fred Conrad_NY TimesKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley  speaks with Mark Bittman. Mark is probably most famous for his cookbooks How to Cook Everything, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, and Vegan Before 6. He is now an opinion columnist for the New York Times and many other publications, focused on policy, agriculture, health, the environment as well as cooking and eating. He’s an outspoken advocate of the idea that we all just need to cook more. His new book How To Cook Everything Fast is in bookstores now.

Mary and Mark discuss the simple changes we can all make to improve our diets. Mark also outlines the many ways we can take action outside our own kitchens.

You can find links to Mark’s books, videos and columns at MarkBittman.com.

Watch Mark’s keynote address at the 2014 Edible Institute.

Get the new book from your favorite local, independent bookstore

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The Kitchen Workshop: Glorious Kale with Catherine Walthers

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley is joined by Catherine Walthers. Cathy is a personal chef and food writer. She is the author of four cookbooks, the latest of which is Kale, Glorious Kale.

Join us in the Workshop as Mary and Cathy discuss varieties of kale, the perfect kale chip and kale cocktails! Cathy also shares her secret for making the perfect kale salad (hint: it involves massage therapy!).


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Recipes below the fold for Kale Granola and the Emerald Gimlet Cocktail

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