Archive | Podcasts

Kitchen Workshop: Cream Puffs and More with Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan - Photo by  Alan Richardson

Dorie Greenspan – Photo by Alan Richardson

Kitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, editor and publisher of Edible Pioneer Valley, speaks to Dorie Greenspan about her latest book Baking Chez Moi, Recipes from my Paris Home to your Home Anywhere. Listen and learn about falling in love (with pastry), the intricacies of working with French butter in American kitchens and the secret of “The French Bake”.

Learn more about Dorie Greenspan

Order the book from a local, independent bookseller:


Shop Indie Bookstores

 

 

We discussed success with cream puffs on the show. Here is Dorie’s recipe for Chocolate Cream Puffs with Mascarpone Filling.

Read More
Continue Reading ·

Underground Airwaves – Chewing the Fat with Render Magazine

cover_webThere is a new quarterly magazine in Portland and it will likely interest readers of Edible Publications.  Render and the focus of the magazine is on food and feminism.  After a successful Kickstarter campaign this past summer, they have started printing the magazine.  The first issue of the magazine takes a look at flesh; from women in the field of butchering to food and issues with weight.

On this episode of the podcast we talk with Gabi de Leon, founder and creative director, and Danielle Knott, executive director, about the origin story of the magazine as well as what they want to accomplish five years down the road. Gabi starts off the podcast with a story about how a butchering class with the Portland Meat Collective enabled her to be more in touch with her own flesh. The story and interview were recorded at KBOO Community Radio.

You can subscribe to Render Magazine at RenderFoodMag.com

 

Read More
Continue Reading ·

The Kitchen Workshop: More from Saveur’s India Issue with Kellie Evans

saveur__aambaIn this episode we continue our conversation on Saveur’s India issue, with Kellie Evans, an Associate Editor at Saveur. As the hunter, gatherer and writer of recipes for Saveur she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how recipes are produced for each issue.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:

Aamba Khatta (Sweet and Sour Mango Pickle)
Aloo Masala (South Indian Masala Potatoes)
Caramel Lassi
Ghanta Tarkari (Mixed Vegetable Coconut Curry)
Dosas
Palakoora Vepadu (Andhra-Style Sautéed Spinach)

Read More
Continue Reading ·

The Kitchen Workshop: Indian Wedding Food with Saveur’s Betsy Andrews

saveur__maacherWe spoke with Betsy Andrews, Acting Editor in Chief of Saveur Magazine, about Saveur’s India Issue. Join us on this podcast for a discussion of the culinary traditions of different regions of India. Betsy was a visitor at a wedding in Kashmir and tells us about the traditional wedding caterer (waza) and the 36-dish feast (wazwaan) he prepares. Enjoy the flavors of a Kashmiri wedding with Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce).

She also takes us to the Kashmiri city of Srinagar and together we visit its marvelous floating gardens and boat markets.

Visit the Saveur website to find the entire India Issue plus the stories that couldn’t fit into the magazine.

Recipes from this podcast:
Maacher Johl (Bengali-Style Fish Stew)
Mirchi Qorma (Kashmiri Lamb in Chile Sauce)
Sevaya Kheer (Vermicelli Milk Pudding)
Shahi Tukra (Royal Toast)
Smita Chandra’s Rasam (Spicy Tamarind Soup)

On this episode, Betsy Andrews of Saveur Magazine describes her visit to the Kashmir region of India. As we recorded, in early September 2014, news reports describing the worst monsoon flooding and landslides in 100 years started to come out of the region. As of September 17, the current death toll from the floods in Indian Kashmir is estimated at over 200, and tens of thousands of residents are homeless. Our thoughts go out to the victims of the disaster.

Read More
Continue Reading ·

Underground Airwaves: Chehalem Mountain Winemakers

Chehalem MountainOn a hot summer day, a number of winemakers gathered at Arbor Brook Vineyards in anticipation of the wine celebration event Origin ’14. There were several white tents set up around the yard providing shade for the guests. In one tent, there was a conversation about the history of the Chehalem Mountain AVA (American Viticultural Area aka designated wine grape-growing regions), and each winemaker gave a brief background on their winery. In another tent, I set up a mini-recording studio where I recorded a story from each of the winemakers present. This episode of the podcast features a story from James Frey of Trisaetum, Sheila Nickolas of Anam Cara, and Todd Hansen of Longplay, as well as their thoughts on the future of making wines in Oregon.

Find more information about the Chehalem Mountain AVA and Origins ’14 at ChehalemMountains.org.

Read More
Continue Reading ·

The Kitchen Workshop: Summer Cocktails with Maggie Batista

maggie-battista-Eat-BoutiqueKitchen Workshop host Mary Reilly, publisher and editor of Edible Pioneer Valley, talks with Maggie Battista, cook, writer and traveler! Maggie is the proprietress of EatBoutique a website and artisanal foods emporium; and is the author of the upcoming book Food. Gift. Love.

Rhubarb Cordial

How to make fruit cordials

Limoncello

Making fruit vinegars

More recipes –

How to make a fruit syrup
Combine equal parts fruit, sugar and water (by volume) in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. When the syrup is brightly colored (this will take 5-10 minutes with softer fruit like blueberries or strawberries and over 15 minutes with less-tender fruit like rhubarb. Strain and let cool before using in a drink.

Here are the cocktails we made on the show:

Rhubarb-orange Sidecar

  • 1.5 oz  fresh orange
  • Juice 1.5 oz lemon juice
  • 1 oz rhubarb syrup
  • 1 1/2 oz brandy

Combine in an iced cocktail shaker. Shake hard until chilled and strain into a cocktail glass.

Strawberry-basil Cocktail

  • 1/2 ounce strawberry syrup
  • ½ ounce lime juice
  • 4 basil leaves
  • 2 ounces gin, preferably Hendrick’s or a Plymouth style (use vodka if you prefer)

Combine in an iced cocktail shaker. Shake hard until chilled and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a basil leaf.  

Cheers!

Read More
Continue Reading ·

Underground Airwaves: Chef Dan Barber & The Third Plate

1304p40-healthy-habits-hero-dan-barber-mWhile “farm to table” eating is exciting and inspiring and focuses on many of the problems of industrial agriculture, it has mostly failed to change the way we eat. In his book, The Third Plate: Field notes on the Future of Food, chef and author Dan Barber discusses the next steps in creating a sustainable food system. In this episode, Dan talks about learning from the process of attempting to translate the agricultural landscape in the Spanish Dehesa to upstate New York. We also discuss the book, what a sustainable food future entails, and the chefs role in that future.

Find more information about The Third Plate

Read the Edible Iowa Review of The Third Plate

 

Buy your copy now from your local, independent bookseller

Read More
Continue Reading ·

The Drink Tank: Author Bryce Bauer on Iowa’s Templeton Rye

Bryce-Bauer_BW-237x300Drink Tank host Gibson Thomas, publisher and editor of edible Marin & Wine Country, talks to Bryce T. Bauer, the Hearst Award-winning author of the soon-to-be-released book, Gentlemen Bootleggers:  The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition and a Small Town in Cahoots (July 1, 2014, ChicagoReview Press).

Gentlemen Bootleggers tells the story of the citizens of one small town in Iowa that embraced the distilling and selling of spirits during the 13 years of Prohibition and how their assistance nurtured the production of high quality rye whiskey still revered today, Templeton Rye.  Operating at the same time as Al Capone, who earned himself the moniker “Public Enemy Number One” because of his riches and the path of violence he left in his bootlegging wake, Joseph Irlbeck, the German-born founder of Templeton Rye, seems to have been motivated not by personal fame or fortune, but by the desire to produce a truly premium spirit.

The Prohibition-era alternatives for a wee bit of festivity were not pretty – high cost spirits imported from Canada or purchased from one of Capone’s cohorts, or poisonous substances like high alcohol mouthwash, Sterno gel and even inexpertly distilled spirits given a “kick” by the addition of car battery acid.  No wonder Irlbeck, and many other Americans, turned to making their own.

With the help of the town’s Mayor, Justice of the Peace, and even the Monsignor who allowed the keeping of a still in the basement of the Catholic Church, Templeton’s bootleggers managed to keep one step ahead of the law for the most part – despite persistent raids and harassment by over zealous Federal agents.

Bauer is also co-writing and co-producing a documentary about the subject, Whiskey Cookers:  The Amazing Story of the Bootleggers of Templeton, Iowa.  


Buy the book now from your local, independent bookseller

Read More
Continue Reading ·

Facebook

Twitter